get your poem on #72c (and oh, my, it’s the last day of april!)

by the Read Write Poem Staff

Today is not only a Get Your Poem On Thursday, it is the Last Day of April, the last day of National Poetry Month. It is the last day of NaPoWriMo!

Here is your chance to leave us link to your poem for today (if you have been NaPoWriMo-ing), or for the week (if you have been avoiding that whole scene). Did you listen this week? Have you been inspired by birdsong or traffic noise? Whatever you’ve heard and written about, now is the time to share it with your fellow participants!

Let us know. We’ll leave the light on this post for a week so you can comment all you want.

Please, link back here in your posts, either with a hyperlink to Read Write Poem or by using the badge in your post. Sidebar links are great but it’s important for the group’s “internet health” that you link here with every post you contribute to the project. And please add “Read Write Poem” in your tags, if you don’t mind. Search engines come up with weird stuff when they look for “RWP,” such as “Radiation Work Permit.” We’d much rather link them up with our poetry than with something from a bad sci-fi movie, or “event.”

Please take a few moments to read the the About page and our Copyrights page. If you have any questions about the project after reading through those pages, e-mail us at info (at) readwritepoem (dot) org.

For the new folks: Please take a few moments to read the About pages, including our Copyrights page. If you have any questions about the project after reading through those pages, email us at info (at) readwritepoem (dot) org.

napowrimo #29: i don’t think i can

by Carolee Sherwood

Wednesdays this month, we’ve been trying to give you list-based prompts. Today, I’d like you to do a quick 5-minute free-write on this subject: “I don’t think I can.” Start every sentence in the free-write with “I don’t think I can.” (I don’t think I can write another poem. I don’t think I can live without chocolate. I don’t think I can clean the house before my husband gets home.) Repeat it and repeat it.

Don’t think too much. Move quickly. You’re not trying to craft a poem at this stage. You’re just trying to move fast enough so that your mind accidentally gives up poem clues. You’ve been at this NaPoWriMo thing for a while. Your mind is onto you. You’re going to have to trick it.

Then, you have a couple of choices for writing your poem. The first option is to cross out all the “I don’t think I cans” and see what list of actions you end up with. Do they tell an interesting story? Do they create a small character study? Are they “shoulds”? Are they things you want to do but haven’t? Are they things you’re afraid to try? What if you tried them? You can title your piece “I don’t think I can” or give it a new title that twists the meaning of your list somehow.

The second option is to choose one of the things your list says you can’t do and write an instruction poem describing “how to” do that thing.

You have plowed through NaPoWriMo. Today is Day 29. You can do it!

(You may wonder, “Why bother to write ‘I don’t think I can’ so many times? Isn’t that busy work?” It’s not busy work. You repeat the lead-in to your sentence each time so that your brain gets into a rhythm and so that it resets itself and removes the temptation to get too clever or slow down and think too much. Just keep writing. The first thing that comes to mind: I don’t think I can. And then write down the next thing.)

Note: This month, since we’re all trying to write every day, we’re leaving the comments open with each prompt so you can post links to your poems as you write them. So, go ahead and write your poem, post your poem (with a link to Read Write Poem and a Read Write Poem tag, if you would) and come back to this very spot and share your link with us.

Of course, if you’re a creature of habit, you can always post your links at tomorrow’s “Get Your Poem On” post. Who are we to mess around with what works for you?

And don’t forget to go read the poems of others in this wonderful writing community. We’re all in this NaPoWriMo “mess” (ha ha!) together; let’s support each other in the insanity that is writing (every day)!

napowrimo #28: seeing red

by Jill Crammond Wickham

Today, keep track of all the things you see that are red; be creative. Red-faced is as good as a red tomato or a red sky. Use the ones that interest you most in a poem.

For added enjoyment, try coming up with several synonyms for red to use in your poem. Stuck? Visit the Visual Thesaurus.

* * *

A note from “admin”: This month, since we’re all trying to write every day, we’re leaving the comments open with each prompt so you can post links to your poems as you write them. So, go ahead and write your poem, post your poem (with a link to Read Write Poem and a Read Write Poem tag, if you would) and come back to this very spot and share your link with us.

Of course, if you’re a creature of habit, you can always post your links at this week’s “Get Your Poem On” post. Who are we to mess around with what works for you?

And don’t forget to go read the poems of others in this wonderful writing community. We’re all in this NaPoWriMo “mess” (ha ha!) together; let’s support each other in the insanity that is writing (every day)!

read write word #15 and napowrimo #27

by Jessica Fox-Wilson

Sadly, April is coming to a close. If you were participating in NaPoWriMo, you’re seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. Maybe you feel exhausted by all of the writing or perhaps you’re exhilarated by all that you’ve accomplished. Either way, you only have a few more poems to go. Why not use some of these words, supplied by Nicole, to propel you to the finish line?

It’s easy to play along with the Read Write Word prompt. Take as many (or as few) of these donated words and use them to write a poem. Once you’re done, link to the poem in the comments here or wait until Thursday’s Get Your Poem On post, if you prefer.

If you want to add to the fun, simply email a list of words to info (at) readwritepoem (dot) org and we can use them in a future prompt. Have fun!

read write word 15

All of our word collages are created at the awesome Wordle site.

napowrimo #26: let's get metaphysical

by Christine Swint

It’s our day to shine the light of our awareness on our inner selves, and maybe even ask some questions about what exists in our deepest hearts. Whenever I’m in the mood to think about the big questions, like where I came from or where I’ll be going, I turn to the poetry of Rumi and Hafiz. These two Persian poets are examples of mystics who wrote about their interior lives in respect to something greater than themselves.

One of the more well-known contemporary translators of Rumi’s poetry into English is Coleman Barks. Here is a link to one of his translations, “What Was Told, That.”

And here’s the first stanza of the poem:

What was said to the rose that made it open was said
to me here in my chest.

Rumi was a medieval psychonaut who explored his connection to the universe by diving inward. Today, if you like, read “What Was Told, That,” and then write a poem in response.

Or, you can try responding to a poem by Hafiz. Daniel Ladinsky has translated “The Woman I Love,” by Hafiz. Read this poem, and write your own love poem to whatever you find when you look deeply into your own heart.

* * *

A note from “admin”: This month, since we’re all trying to write every day, we’re leaving the comments open with each prompt so you can post links to your poems as you write them. So, go ahead and write your poem, post your poem (with a link to Read Write Poem and a Read Write Poem tag, if you would) and come back to this very spot and share your link with us.

Of course, if you’re a creature of habit, you can always post your links at this week’s “Get Your Poem On” post. Who are we to mess around with what works for you?

And don’t forget to go read the poems of others in this wonderful writing community. We’re all in this NaPoWriMo “mess” (ha ha!) together; let’s support each other in the insanity that is writing (every day)!

read write poem news

  • read write poem napowrimo anthology
    June 20, 2010 | 1:36 pm

    The Read Write Poem NaPoWriMo Anthology is still in production. Selection, placement, layout and copyediting are taking longer than anticipated. Thank you for your patience. I hope to have the piece completed in July. For those who have emailed asking if they can be included, the May 7 deadline for submission of work stands. Those who met that deadline will be included. Please check the post on this site listing who I received submissions from by that date. If you submitted your work by the May 7 deadline in accordance with our guidelines and your name is not listed, send an email to info (at) readwritepoem (dot) org.

  • read write poem napowrimo anthology
    May 5, 2010 | 3:09 pm

    Remember that Friday* is the deadline for submitting work to the Read Write Poem NaPoWriMo Anthology. Check out the guidelines for submission in the main column (to the left). On May 8, we’ll post a news item listing everyone we’ve received work from. If you submitted work and your name is not on that list, please let us know. Thanks!

    *I initially said “tomorrow,” but I meant to say “Friday.”

  • napowrimo congratulations, and a reminder
    April 24, 2010 | 12:05 pm

    It’s the final week of the Read Write Poem NaPoWriMo Challenge! Just 7 days left. With that, a reminder that Read Write Poem will culminate with the anthology featuring work from those who complete the challenge. A post with details for submitting to the anthology will be published May 1. Be sure you remove any information from the site that you want preserved — such as group content and personal messages. Those elements of the site will be removed May 1 as well. The main site will remain up as an archive.

  • ‘underlife’ tour at january gill o’neil’s blog
    April 20, 2010 | 8:11 pm

    January Gill O’Neil’s virtual book tour has moved to her site and is underway now. Check out the lineup at Poet Mom.

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